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How Seasons Can Affect Horses

Originally posted on craftedincarhartt:

how seasons can affect horses -- Crafted in Carhartt how seasons can affect horses -- Crafted in Carhartt
how seasons can affect horses -- Crafted in Carhartt
how seasons can affect horses -- Crafted in Carhartt
how seasons can affect horses -- Crafted in Carhartt
how seasons can affect horses -- Crafted in Carhartt
how seasons can affect horses -- Crafted in Carhartt
how seasons can affect horses -- Crafted in Carhartt
how seasons can affect horses -- Crafted in Carhartt

I don’t know about you, but this never-ending winter is getting to me. Have you ever wondered how seasons can affect your animals? I did a little reading on how the year’s changes can bring about certain transformations in horses. Here are some tidbits of what I learned:

Spring
expedites the growth of grass. Again, you’ll see spikes in potassium and nitrates. The warmer temperatures and damp conditions are prime for fungus producing myco-toxins. Watch out for Rye Grass staggers. With the increased grass, your horse can gain weight. Too much weight gain can put your horse at risk for type 2 diabetes. If you fear your horse is eating too much, a grazing muzzle may be your solution.

Summer climates allow grass growth to continue. Again, spikes in potassium and nitrates should be on your mind. Horses tend to be more relaxed during dry summers. Always have drinking water…

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China’s “war on pollution” may end up accelerating global warming

Originally posted on Quartz:

This week, the Chinese government vowed to launch a “war on pollution.” Public enemy number one will have to be coal-fired power plants, whose emissions kill more than a quarter-million people a year, according to Greenpeace. In fact, a coal industry forum this week declared that China’s coal consumption will peak by 2020 (link in Chinese), and then start falling by 0.4% annually thereafter.

This sounds like great news. But it also begs the question, with coal now providing 65% of China’s energy, where’s the cleaner energy that’s going to replace it coming from?

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China doesn’t have enough natural gas to meet its energy needs, and its nuclear sector is also relatively small. Clean technologies such as wind and solar are still immature. That’s why a lot of the country’s energy will come from “coal natural gas,” a.k.a. synthetic natural gas or syngas. Created by…

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